Video: Investing in Living Walls: Factors for Specification and Maintenance

Our very own Shelley Mosco giving a brief introduction in this video to our upcoming Investing in Living Walls: Factors for Specification course outlining what the course is about and who it is ideal for.

The course will be held over two days in April (19th – 20th) @UniofGreenwich.

For full details click here and to book your tickets click on the Eventbrite link.

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ecobuild 2018

The ecobuild conference is one of the biggest events in the built environment calendar with over 450 exhibitors at the show this year and around 25,000 visitors. The event showcases the latest innovations and products from various sectors and companies and this year we were able to visit and see what the industry had to offer in terms of biophilic architecture.

During the event we were also able to promote our upcoming events to industry professionals getting even more attendees to join us for our exciting conferences and short courses!

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Also a big thanks to Watermatic for providing us with a space to promote our events at their excellent stand with live demonstrations of their living wall systems at ecobuild 2018. Be sure to visit their website and check out their new products!


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Ecobuild has been the number one event for the built environment for over 14 years, with change and innovation always at the heart. It connects and inspires the entire built environment specification chain.

06-08 March 2018 / ExCeL, London

Investing in Living Walls: Factors for Specification and Maintenance (19-20 April 2018)

Living Walls have increasingly become more prevalent with numerous new systems on the market. For anyone specifying living walls, trying to determine their value or any underlying problems, there is overwhelming and often biased information that hampers decision making.

Topics Covered:

Day One will held at the University of Greenwich in the new Stockwell Street building and will cover theoretical issues of specifying living walls:

  • The benefits of living walls (ecosystems services)
  • Differing system types and their relative sustainability
  • Plan selection (basic)
  • Maintenance requirements
  • Fire regulations relating to living walls

Day Two will be mainly practical with a study tour of selected living walls, to see first-hand issues relating to their installation and maintenance. This will involve walking outdoors, wear suitable clothing. The day will end with a round table discussion of the theoretical and practical issues of living walls. Participants to pay for own transport costs during the day.

Please note lunch is not provided.

Key Benefits

The course is taught by an industry expert who has designed living walls for many years and is involved in the latest living walls research.

Classes are small allowing plenty of scope for discussion and some tailoring of the course to your individual or company requirements.

A Certificate of Completion will be awarded to those who attend the course and actively participate in class exercises and discussion.

Who is the course for?

This course is particularly suitable for planners, specifiers, architects, landscape architects, interior designers, housing associations or anyone thinking of investing in a living wall.

FAQs

How can I contact the organiser with any questions?

Telephone: 0208 331 7688

Email: ACH-ShortCourses@gre.ac.uk

What’s the refund policy?

The University of Greenwich reserves the right to cancel a course up to 7 days before an event and all payments received will be refunded in full to delegates.

A delegate can cancel their registration up to 14 days before the event and receive a full refund. If the cancellation is received between 7 and 14 days before an event the delegate is eligible for a refund of 50%. If the cancellation takes place less than 7 days before an event the delegate is not eligible for a refund.

Aquaponics: From Science to Practice (09-10 April 2018)

Aquaponics: From Science to Practice‘ is the final COST FA 1305 conference. euah

Join us at the University of Greenwich (London) in April to hear about our achievements over the past four years, and to get insight to the latest research and development in aquaponics. The event is free.

Key note speakers:

Ranka Junge (Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland): Strategic points in aquaponics

Janelle Hager (Kentucky State University, USA): Current trends and the potential for growth of aquaponics in the US: A research perspective

Kristina Adams (Adams Aquafarm, Barbados): tbc

Ryan Chatterson (Chatterson Farms, USA): Commercial aquaponics in the United States: The current industry and opportunities for the future

Other confirmed speakers:

Simon Goddek (Wageningen University, Netherlands): Future perspectives on aquaponics

Boris Delaide (University of Liège, Belgium): Mineral elements in aquaponics: their impact on lettuce production and potential improvement of their availability

Zala Schmautz (Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland): Nutrient dynamics and microbial diversity in an aquaponic system

Carolina Castro (University of Porto, Portugal): Effects of Nile tilapia and African catfish production on the growth of basil in a coupled aquaponic experimental recirculating system

Carlo Nicoletto (University of Padua, Italy): Evaluation of a low tech aquaponic system: results of the first 3 crop cycles

Robert Röllig (Rostock University, Germany): Microalgae cultivation for bioremediation of nutrients under aquaponic conditions

Peter Dapprich (South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Germany): A survey of plant pathogens

Hijran Yavuzcan (Ankara University, Turkey): Fish welfare and biosecurity issues

Bozidar Raskovic (University of Belgrade, Serbia): Effects of pesticides on biofilter bacteria in aquaponics

Andras Bittsanszky (InDeRe Institute, Hungary): Plant protecting agents for aquaponic systems

Bettina König (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany): How can aquaponics contribute to more sustainable food production and consumption?

Andrea Forchino (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy): Betting on sustainability: the Life Cycle Thinking approach to aquaponics

Carmelo Maucieri (University of Padua, Italy): Aquaponics for educational purposes: A Life Cycle Assessment

Kyra Hoevenaars (AquaBioTech Group, Malta): EU policies: opportunities for aquaponics

Agnes Joly (Aquaprimeur, France): Aquaponics entrepreneur strategies in Europe

Morris Villarroel (Technical University of Madrid, Spain): Aquaponics in the EU

Harry Palm (Rostock University, Germany): Perspectives and constraints on the commercialization of aquaponics in Germany

Ragnheidur Thorarinsdottir (Svinna-verkfraedi Ltd/University of Iceland): What is special about aquaponics produce?

Faris Farrag (Bustan Aquaponics, Egypt): Commercial scale aquaponics in middle income countries

Download the full conference programme


COST Action FA1305 EU Aquaponics Hub

Organiser of Aquaponics: From Science to Practice

The EU Aquaponics Hub is a four year COST (Cooperation in Science and Technology) networking Action that brings together a heterogenous group of scientists, researchers and SMEs from across the EU and around the globe to better understand the state of knowledge in aquaponics in Europe and around the world and to facilitate innovation and education in this field of sustainable fish and vegetal food production. 

The EU Aquaponics Hub is composed of members from: Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, UK and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

The EU Aquaponics Hub organises regular conferences and training schools on aquaponics, and facilitates the research of PhD students and postdocs through the provision of grants for Short Term Scientific Missions. More details can be found on the EU Aquaponics Hub website.

ABC: Activating Biophilic Cities Conference (4-5 September 2018)

The University of Greenwich Green Roofs and Living Walls Centre and the Department of Architecture & Landscape are proud to announce their ABC: Activating Biophilic Cities London Conference on 4-5 September 2018.

Keynote Speakers

Dr Tim Beatley, University of Virgina – is an internationally recognised biophilic city researcher and author and founder of Biophilic Cities Network Project.

Oliver Heath, Oliver Heath Design – is an industry recognised expert in the field of biophilic architectural and interior design.

The aim of this conference is to bring together academics, built environment professionals (architects, planners, landscape architects, environmental specialists etc.), educational and health professionals in order to share the latest research and best practice in biophilic design and to kick-start the pace of change towards holistically providing healthy places and spaces that improve the quality of life for people in our cities.

The event will consist of keynote addresses by eminent experts and peer reviewed papers on the principles and practice of biophilic design. Workshops will be used to develop a ‘Biophilic City Manifesto‘ which will facilitate the widespread adoption of the principles of biophilic design. The workshops will cover the following themes:

  • Planning the biophilic city
  • Designing restorative landscapes
  • Well buildings
  • The biophilic workplace
  • Designing healing spaces
  • Biophilic learning spaces

Participate and activate your part in this process. Become part of the drive to turn the commonplace into the exceptional place.

 

81% of the UK’s population currently live in urban areas*, estranged from nature, an essential element for good health. Biophilic design aims to reconnect humankind with nature, sustaining a physical relationship in order to improve overall environmental conditions (e.g. purifying water, detoxifying air pollution, increasing biodiversity etc.) as well as improving well-being, mental and physical health and improving productivity in offices, schools, hospitals and in the home.

Natural elements such as street trees and planting have been a feature of cities for hundreds of years. Today the ecosystem services that city vegetation delivers, through avenues, parks and gardens, urban forests, green roofs and living walls, are well known and largely celebrated. The necessity for clean air, natural light, sunlight, natural materials and plants are also a prerequisite for health and wellbeing outside our buildings as well as inside. By increasing nature and natural elements indoors, sick building syndrome will become a thing of the past.

Help make September the 5th Biophilic Cities Day, a day to celebrate how we incorporate nature into our urban environment.

* Data by United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division

Purchase your ticket now through Eventbrite and visit the conference website for full details: https://www.gre.ac.uk/ach/events/biophilic 

For further information please contact us using the form below:

 


Dr Tim Beatley is currently ‘Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities’ in the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture, University Of Virginia. He is an internationally recognised biophilic city researcher, founder of the Biophilic Cities Network Project and author of several books on environmental sustainability, ‘Green Urbanism’ and biophilic city design.  His most recent publication ‘Handbook of Biophilic City Planning & Design’ is acclaimed internationally by both academics and industry leader.
Oliver Heath is an industry recognised expert in the field of biophilic architectural and interior design and . He is currently involved in ‘The BRE Biophilic Office Project’ to implement biophilic design strategies to provide tangible human well-being benefits. The project will provide both qualitative and quantitative data to understand and benefit from an improved connection to nature in the workplace. As a qualified Domestic Energy and Green Deal assessor he frequently acts as a media spokesperson for the UK’s Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), the Energy Saving Trust and the Waste Resources Action Programme (WRAP).

Other speakers will be added to the website once confirmed.

Incredible Edible Wall for Glyndon

Glyndon Community Centre Edible Wall

Glyndon Community Centre Edible Wall

Sustainable Landscapes Research Group have partnered with Glyndon Community Group in Woolwich to erect Glyndon Community Centre’s first living wall in June 2013.

They provide facilities for healthy recreation and leisure time occupation to improve the quality of life and provide social interaction for local people, amongst them are school groups, the elderly and youth offender training.

The wall is planted ‘potager-style’ a mix of edible and decorative plants.  Initially we will be assessing the Living Wall to ascertain:

  • Benefits in providing increased landuse for food production in this high density, potentially contaminated area where productive land is limited;
  • The range of plants that can be grown successfully for their nutritional and economic value;
  • Their usefulness to people with mobility issues who may have difficulty in accessing horizontal gardens;
  • Their capacity to impact practice for sustainable food production.

Early indications are that the wall has become a big hit with the volunteers who maintain it. They’ve already been picking herbs and strawberries from the wall. Meta Killick, Chair of Glyndon Community Group said ‘Our chief waterer is calling it the Wall of Paradise…’  Although there is a reservoir (for harvesting rainwater) and solar energy charged pump operating the irrigation system, this is a new technology for the many who volunteer.

Drought Tolerances of Sedum and Sempervivum in Living Walls

 

Sempervivum species planted August 2013

Sempervivum species planted August 2013

Following our earlier research of edible plants in Humko’s living wall system, we found that curly parsley, Petroselinum crispum responded remarkably well to drought and heat conditions over the summer. We are now looking at  tolerances of other plants in vertical conditions.

It is known that many sedum species are drought tolerant but little is  known about how they respond in vertical conditions.  Partnering with  ANS Group (Europe), we will be testing both the albido of plants and thermal tolerances of selected sedum, sempervivum and grasses  during the next phase of our research.

Award Winning Living Wall at RHS Chelsea 2013

A living wall designed by Shelley Mosco, Greenwich lecturer and research assistant, was part of Stoke-on-Trent’s Story of Transformation garden which was awarded a silver medal.

The living tapestry of plants depicting the Peak District, which formed a backdrop to the show garden and the city of Stoke on Trent. The living wall is the largest ever in the 100 year history of The Chelsea Flower Show.

Shelley is an expert in living wall systems.  She recently designed the country’s largest living wall for Network Rail’s Birmingham New Street Station (over 350m2), as well as two walls for the new NUS headquarters.

Stoke-on_Trent award winning garden

Stoke-on_Trent award winning garden

The University’s first Living Wall is completed

The University’s first living wall was built over the weekend of 23/24 February 2013, thereby launching the first stage of our research on the performance of plants in relation to microclimate, water resource management and the development of living walls for urban agriculture.

The Sustainable Landscapes Research Group and a team of Certificate Landscape Design students, led by Benz Kotzen and Shelley Mosco, built the planted modular wall outside ‘Greengages’ cafe at Avery Hill. It’s ‘X’ shape provides different sun/shade aspects and microclimates for the plants and the multi-coloured modules presents an opportunity to research thermal variations.

wall detail

The modules
The wall is also a teaching/learning resource for plant biodiversity. We will be adding plants to the wall as our research develops but so far the plants comprise the following native species:

Chives, Allium sphaerocephalon
Cluster Bellflower, Campanula glomerata
Wild Basil, Clinopodium vulgare
Wild Carrot, Daucus carota
Ox-eye Daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare
Wild Marjoram, Origanum vulgare
Creeping Thyme, Thymus serpyllum

The wall is intended to be the first of many, which will focus on urban agriculture and growing food vertically in our cities. The Research Group is planning to set up a community system on one of the local Greenwich estates and also to incorporate a number of living wall systems on the new School roof at Stockwell Street.

completed wall